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Things and stuff, you know which are relevant to my interests. Science Fiction is on top of that list, and Pokemon, definately Pokemon.

tasia-reader:

The best thing about this episode was Tom Sawyer’s hatred of Missouri.

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.
The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.


Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

pokemon-global-academy:

Polygon opened a site dedicated to Pokemon! (Pokegon

I am Groot

themasterslover:

death in supernatural will always be more badass than all the characters put together

typhonatemybaby:

Legendary Wolf.

i dont think teen wolf has actualy ever topped this moment. it was kind of downhill after this crowning moment of genius

book one: professor mcgonnagal and the you put a WHAT in our WHERE albus
book two: professor mcgonnagal and the we have a WHAT IN OUR WHERE ALBUS
book three: professor mcgonnagal and the ministry is sending us WHAT because of WHO
book four: professor mcgonnagal and the ARE YOU SHITTING ME ALBUS
book five: professor mcgonnagal and the we have WHO telling us to do WHAT
book six: professor mcgonnagal and the albus do something NO NOT THAT
book seven: professor mcgonnagal and the I FINALLY GET TO BLOW SHIT UP THANK YOU WIZARD GOD

suburbanwhitemomvevo:

  • gender equality
  • you can have sex with anyone you want and no ones gonna judge you
  • bastards arent treated like shit
  • the highborns can marry commoners and no one gives a shit
  • its sunny all the time in dorne
  • their fighting style is like 104% badass-er than everyone else
  • oberyn martell is one hot piece of ass
  • their house words should be im sexy and i know it

fnurfnur:

devil-whore-bitch:

They’ve got civilians trapped.

I love that while the avengers fought the aliens you also see them helping to evacuate people so they are safe. It’s not just fighting, it’s rescue as well.

Sorry I couldn’t hear you over the sound of Jeremy Renner’s gun show

whale-child:

pk—-love:

THE CREATOR HAS SPOKEN

whale-child:

pk—-love:

THE CREATOR HAS SPOKEN

becausebuckysbutt:

Everyone says they was to see Cap pick up Thor’s hammer in AoU, but everyone knows that Cap’s a good guy.

No, what I want is for Natasha to pick it up. In the heat of battle, and it lands beside her, and she gets cornered so she grabs for a piece of debris to attack with and she just swings it completely without meaning too.

Then she realises that maybe she’s good, maybe she’s wiped out the red in her ledger.

Maybe she’ll realise that she’s a hero.

potterbird:

"I’m just gonna ask you 73 questions in an unreasonably short amount of time.”